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Philosophy of the track

This track offers the possibility of comparative study and analysis of anglophone and related literatures, and engages in depth with major authors, the most significant literary genres, periods and movements, applying a range of critical and methodological approaches to the interpretation of texts within different geographical and historical contexts.

Given the transcultural nature of the English language and literature in a globalized world, the critical and interdisciplinary analysis of social and cultural practices within the realities of a particular place are given prominence. The aim is to develop the ability to identify ethical and socio-political issues in literature, art and culture more generally, within a broader understanding of the contemporary role of the critical humanities.

Objectives

The track in Anglophone Literature and Cultural Studies is designed to provide students with the ability to:

For a description of the courses offered by the track, please click here or scroll down the page. It is important that you check the list of prerequisites for the courses of the track (given at the bottom of the page).

 

Track Structure and Degree Requirements

LIT Anglophone Literature and Cultural Studies track
LING Theoretical and Applied Linguistics track
TRA Translation Studies track
FL Foreign Language
UE University Elective

  

  1st YEAR (General course of study, common in all tracks)  
     
1st SEMESTER   ECTS
 ENG 101  English for Academic Purposes 5
 ENG 110  Introduction to the Study of Fiction 5
 ENG 120  Introduction to the Study of Poetry 5
 ENG 160  Introduction to Linguistics 5
 ENG 102  Research Skills in the Humanities 5
 FL 1  Foreign Language  5 
     (30)
     
2nd SEMESTER   ECTS 
ENG 103 Academic Essay Writing 5
ENG 130 Introduction to the Study of Drama 5
ENG 161 Language and Mind 5
ENG 170 Introduction to Translation Practice 5
FL 2 Foreign Language 5
UE 1 University Elective 5
    (30)
   Total 1st year: 60
     
  2nd YEAR (Anglophone Literature and Cultural Studies)  
     
3rd SEMESTER   ECTS
ENG 220-229 Topics in Fiction 
ENG 211-219 Topics in Poetry 
FL 3 Foreign Language 
UE 2 University Elective 
 plus 2 out of:    
 ENG 270 Translation Methodology   
 ENG 240 Pedagogical Grammar   
 ENG 250-255 Topics in Phonetics & Phonology of English  2 x 5 
    (30) 
     
 4th SEMESTER    ECTS
ENG 211-219  Topics in Fiction  5
ENG 220-229 Topics in Poetry  5
UE 3 University Elective  5
UE 4 University Elective 5
plus 2 out of:    
ENG 241 Sociolinguistics  
ENG 256-259 Topics in Semantics & Pragmatics  
ENG 260-269 Topics in Morphology & Syntax  
ENG 280 Translation Theory  2 x 5
    (30) 
   Total 2nd year 60 
     
  3rd YEAR (Anglophone Literature and Cultural Studies)   
     
5th SEMESTER   ECTS
ENG 350 EFL Teaching Methodology 7.5 
ENG 330-339 Topics in Theatre 7.5 
ENG 500-539 Elective LIT 7.5 
plus 1 out of:    
ENG 570-599 Elective LING  
ENG 540-569 Elective TRA  
ENG 340 Language Change & Developmen  
ENG 390-399 Topics in Translation Studies 1 x 7.5 (30)
     
6th SEMESTER    ECTS
ENG 310 History of Literary Theory and Criticism 7.5
ENG 330-339 Topics in Theatre 7.5
ENG 500-539 Elective LIT 7.5
plus 1 out of:    
ENG 341 Psycholinguistics  
ENG 540-569 Elective LING  
ENG 570-599 Elective TRA 1 x 7.5 (30)
  Total 3rd year 60 
     
  4th YEAR (Anglophone Literature and Cultural Studies)   
     
 7th SEMESTER   ECTS 
ENG 500-539 Elective LIT 7.5
ENG 500-539 Elective LIT 7.5
ENG 500-539 Elective LIT 7.5
plus 1 out of:    
ENG 500-539 Elective LIT  
ENG 570-599 Elective TRA  
ENG 540-569 Elective LING  
ENG 410 Thesis 1 x 7.5 (30)
     
8th SEMESTER    
ENG 500-539 Elective LIT 7.5
ENG 500-539 Elective LIT 7.5
ENG 500-539 Elective LIT 7.5
plus 1 out of:    
ENG 500-539 Elective LIT  
ENG 570-599 Elective TRA  
ENG 540-569 Elective LING  
ENG 420 Thesis 1 x 7.5 (30)
  Total 4th year: 60
  Grand Total: 240

 

Course Descriptions (top)

 

(a) Compulsory courses

ENG 101 ACADEMIC COMMUNICATION IN ENGLISH

This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of academic tasks, including note-taking of university-level lectures, both from reading and listening inputs, and reading and summarizing text excerpts, journal articles, and essays in a variety of ways, such as scanning, skimming, and critical reading. Further instruction covers planning, drafting, and writing response and critical essays as well as speaking in an academic context.

ENG 102 RESEARCH SKILLS IN THE HUMANITIES

The course aims to offer students of the Department more systematic guidance in writing academic papers. It aims to function as a preparatory course in order to enhance the research skills needed for papers and presentations both in Literature and Linguistics. The course comprises four main areas: (i) acquainting students with the University library and electronic catalogues, (ii) working with the internet, (iii) introducing MS-Word and PowerPoint, and (iv) dealing with problems of correct citation of bibliography.

ENG 103 ACADEMIC ESSAY WRITING

This course is designed to be a gateway to the English major. It reviews the areas students can focus on within current-day English studies and then turns their attention to two such focus areas, i.e. writing critically about literature and further examining the way such basics of academic argument as thesis, evidence, and structure are applied to the general academic essay, such as the linguistics paper. Throughout the course, students will get hands-on practice with planning out, researching, and (re)writing intellectually sophisticated essays of the kind that they will be expected to write in upper-level courses within the major.

ENG 110 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF FICTION

The course introduces students to key principles and critical approaches in the study of fiction. There is discussion of types of fiction, and the history and formation of fictional genres. The class will read two novels and several short stories and discuss the main narrative elements, as structuralist theory has defined them. It will also trace the changes these elements have undergone in specific historical periods and in the context of different literary traditions.

ENG 120 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF POETRY

The course introduces students to different historical genres of poetry and to a systematic literary study of the elements of poetry by concentrating on structure, figurative language, metrical arrangements, rhythm, and diction.

ENG 130 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF DRAMA

The course aims to develop in each student an imaginative, meaningful, and enriching experience of drama both as a reading experience and as dramatic performance. The students will be introduced to the techniques of systematic study of drama texts and genres by emphasizing such elements as dramatic structure, character, dialogue, and point of view.

ENG 160 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS

This course is intended to serve as a foundation course for the study of linguistics. It aims to provide a background in the core areas of linguistics, i.e. phonetics and phonology (sounds and sound patterns), morphology (word structure), syntax (sentence structure), and semantics (the meanings of words). Secondarily, it aims to provide an introduction to interdisciplinary fields of linguistics, such as language in the individual (unique characteristics of human language, language acquisition, language disorders etc), the role of language in social organisation, and language change.

ENG 161 LANGUAGE AND MIND

This course provides an introduction to psycholinguistics and the biological basis for language. It will address some fundamental questions regarding human language, such as how language is (i) represented in our minds, (ii) acquired by children, and (iii) processed by adults. Ultimately, this course will explore the relationship between language and thought in a biolinguistic setting, from conceptual-theoretical perspectives (what is often called the philosophy of language) as well as experimental-applied perspectives (psycholinguistics at large).

ENG 170 INTRODUCTION TO TRANSLATION PRACTICE

The course is intended to provide a general foundation in translating. The specific aim is to introduce students to the basic and essential issues involved in language transfer, such as lexical and syntactic equivalence, ambiguity, collocation, idiomaticity, and comparative language usage. Moreover, students will be acquainted with the complexity of the translating task and will be encouraged to discuss problems and possible solutions with the help of translation exercises based on authentic texts of various genres. An additional aim is to familiarize students with the need for in-depth research and the vast research possibilities offered not only by bilingual dictionaries, but also by electronic and printed reference works and aids (e.g. encyclopaedias, glossaries, the internet, and online databases). At the end of the course, students are expected to have developed an awareness of the background involved in language transfer as well as a basic ability to handle translation problems at the micro-structural level.

ENG 211-219 TOPICS IN FICTION: STUDIES IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY NOVEL

In this course, students will study three major novels by three of the most influential prose fiction writers that helped shape the emerging genre of the English novel in the early to mid-eighteenth century. These are (i) Daniel Defoe, The History and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders [1722], (ii) Samuel Richardson, Pamela or, Virtue Rewarded [1740], and (iii) Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, A Foundling [1749]. The historical conditions of the 18th century in England, the particular situation of each writer, but also wider social realities and economic conditions will be discussed in order to achieve a fuller appreciation of the novels' cultural historical signification. Questions of genre will form a substantial concern in the reading of the novels, as will English literary history.

ENG 211-219 TOPICS IN FICTION: STUDIES IN VICTORIAN FICTION

This course will concentrate on questions of literary history, aesthetics and politics in the study of Victorian fiction from the 1830s to the end of the 19th century. Particular areas of focus may include the aesthetics of literary realism and naturalism, the study of fictional genres (Victorian gothic, the Bildungsroman, the social or industrial novel, domestic fiction, detective fiction), stylistic modes (sentimentality, bathos, decadence), and socio-historical contexts (the industrial revolution, empire and imperialism, the separation of spheres, class struggle, crime, deviance and policing, Victorian and late Victorian sexualities).

ENG 211-219 TOPICS IN FICTION: POSTCOLONIAL FICTION

This course will focus on the development, in the post-war period, of Anglophone postcolonial fiction, its rise to global prominence, and its relationship to the decentralization and, effectively, the globalization of "English studies". Particular areas of focus may include questions of literary history (magical realism, the impact of orality and oral traditions, the reinvention of myth, the re-appropriation of the canon, the relationship between postcolonialism and postmodernism), and the study of the role of specific geographical regions or transregional formations.

ENG 211-219 TOPICS IN FICTION: STUDIES IN SHORTER FICTION

This course will focus on the study of shorter fiction from the perspective of literary history, genre theory, and aesthetics. It will concentrate on the generic pre-history of shorter fiction, its basic forms (short story, novella), its initial aesthetic codification during the American Renaissance (Poe, Hawthorne, Melville), and its generic expressions (detective fiction, mystery fiction, the ghost story, allegorical fable, parable, science fiction story, among others). Texts studied will include works by outstanding Anglophone pioneers of the genre and of its generic subdivisions.

ENG 211-219 TOPICS IN FICTION: MODERN AND POSTMODERN FICTION

The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the most representative practices in the area of Anglophone Fiction as well as with the critical and theoretical discourses that have dominated this field from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. More particularly, the course will focus on the critical engagement with the tradition of realism, an engagement which was determining for the development of both modern and postmodern Anglophone fiction. Through the study of selected novels written by some of the most significant novelists of the 20th and 21st centuries, students will have the opportunity to trace the debates around issues which in modern and contemporary criticism are considered fundamental, i.e. the function and reliability of representation, the narrative construction (and deconstruction) of individual and collective identities, the relation between history and story, the political and ideological stakes of metafictional discourse, finally, and the gradual erasure of the distinction between popular fiction and avant-garde writing.

ENG 220-229 TOPICS IN POETRY: POETRY OF THE EARLY MODERN PERIOD

This is a survey course that concentrates on the history and development of the English poem in the early modern period. Covering some of the major poetic figures of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England, students will consider the development of a variety of poetic genres and literary traditions (such as the appropriation of the Petrarchan sonnet and the subsequent transformation of the form by English poets, the tradition of the courtly lyric, metaphysical poetry, and the development of the epic and the pastoral). Through close reading of selected texts, students will be encouraged to consider a variety of elements, such as the use of the classics and classical allusions, the politics of manuscript circulation and the shift from a manuscript to a print culture, and poetry and literary patronage. Students will further be expected to consider the texts within the broader social, cultural, and historical context within which they were produced and to examine (among other things) the politics of the Reformation and Renaissance humanism, the politics of gender, colonization and England's expansion in the New World, and the ideological context of the English Revolution.

ENG 220-229 TOPICS IN POETRY: POETRY OF THE LONG EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

This course focuses on English poetry of the long eighteenth century (the period between the Restoration of monarchy in 1660 and the late 1780s). We will read and discuss the work of many of the canonical and lesser-known poets of the long eighteenth century, focusing on a variety of aesthetic and social issues that marked the writing and publishing of poetry during this period. Among other elements, we will consider prosody and poetic form, neoclassicism, the use of satire, gender and class, poetry as a force for social change or as a form of opposition, and popular literacy and the growth of print culture. By the end of the semester, students will be expected to demonstrate awareness of the broader social, cultural, intellectual, and ideological framework within which texts under study were produced and to be familiar with current scholarly debates concerning the poetry of the period.

ENG 220-229 TOPICS IN POETRY: STUDIES IN ROMANTIC AND VICTORIAN POETRY

This course will focus on the primary significance of lyrical poetry in British Romantic and Victorian poetry. Poets considered will be William Blake, Robert Burns, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats, George Gordon, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Thomas Hardy. Attention will be given to themes and issues of Romantic poetics and aesthetics as foregrounded in the prose writings of such key Romantic figures as Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Shelley. We will also consider the importance of politics and sage discourse as well as the further development of modern poetics and of new themes in Victorian poetry.

ENG 220-229 TOPICS IN POETRY: MAJOR THEMES AND VOICES IN TWENTIETH CENTURY POETRY

This course will take a critical and comparative approach to modern poetry in English in the twentieth century. The focus will be on poetry from the UK and the USA by poets who have achieved significant critical recognition as well as popular acclaim. The selection aims to give some idea also of post-colonial poetry and the greater diversity of voices (writing in English). The course lecture program is generally arranged on the basis of movement, period, theme, but also gender or ethnic background, where these last two are overtly foregrounded in the poet's work.

ENG 240 PEDAGOGICAL GRAMMAR

The course presents an overview of the grammar of English and focuses on topics in English grammar that are relevant to the EFL teacher. It aims at both improving students' own English usage and analyzing problems in English usage of EFL learners.

ENG 241 SOCIOLINGUISTICS

The aim of this course is to study language variation within a social context. It shows how socio-cultural factors, such as social status, occupation, level of education, age, and gender, affect linguistic behaviour.

ENG 250-255 TOPICS IN PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY

This group of courses comprises courses investigating the speech sounds of human languages from an articulatory and an acoustic point of view as well as the basic notions behind the way in which speech sounds are organized into sound systems of different human languages. At a supra-segmental level, it investigates prosodic systems (syllable structure and stress) of human languages. Whilst it starts off with the fundamental concepts of phonetics and phonology, at the same time, it provides the foundation for more advanced treatments of the above topics through different theoretical frameworks within contemporary phonology.

ENG 256-259 TOPICS IN SEMANTICS AND PRAGMATICS

This group of courses contains courses investigating meaning in language (Semantics) and how language is used for communication (Pragmatics). Students are offered the necessary formal tools and analytical methods to examine language meaning, while actual accounts are discussed of various aspects of meaning such as truth, denotation and reference, predication, and quantification. The group also includes courses introducing students to the ways language in use is studied and how inference and context turn language into a powerful communication tool.

ENG 260-269 TOPICS IN MORPHOLOGY AND SYNTAX

These courses go beyond the introductions to word structure (morphology) and sentence structure (syntax). Emphasis will be put on (i) practice in analyzing words and sentences and (ii) elements of modern morphological and syntactic theories. Topic courses may address more specifically morphological theories, morphosyntax, issues in morphology and syntax, and syntactic theory. Among other topics, the Morphology courses will investigate methods of morphological research, morphological rules and mechanisms, the relation between Morphology and Phonology and Morphology and Syntax, the concepts of word and morpheme, of morphological rule and the position of Morphology in the theory of language. Syntax courses will expand upon the transformational-generative approach to sentence structure, stressing understanding of both theoretical concepts and its explanatory power over empirical data. Different modern syntactic theories will also be explored (e.g. Categorial Grammar, Phrase-Structure Grammars, Optimality Theory).

ENG 270 TRANSLATION METHODOLOGY

The aim of this course is to discuss translation as a problem-solving activity and as a decision-making process and to introduce students to the methodology needed to deal with the text in its micro- and macro-structural dimensions. Focus will be put on the distinction between translation strategies (e.g. foreignization vs. domestication) and translation procedures (methods) as well as on the theoretical and methodological interplay between text and cultural background. Specific attention will be given to terminological issues and to translation problems arising from text-typological specificities (genre, function, cultural specificity). Each lesson will outline a set of related notions and problems on the basis of translation exercises. Students are expected to have developed an awareness of what the translation process involves and to have acquired the necessary skills to deal with practical translation problems.

ENG 280 TRANSLATION THEORY

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the main theoretical approaches to Translation Studies and to examine how the phenomenon of translation has been perceived from classical antiquity to the present. The course will examine the historical, philosophical, social, and cultural context in which translation takes place. It will be based on selected readings from classical antiquity, the medieval and renaissance period, 18th and 19th century, through to modernity, postmodernity, and post-coloniality. Students will develop a broad understanding of translation as an activity that goes beyond language, and which in the 20th century has shaped Translation Studies as an interdisciplinary field of study in its own right, drawing on disciplines such as philosophy and anthropology as well as linguistics and literary theory.

ENG 317 HISTORY OF LITERARY THEORY AND CRITICISM

The course aims at raising students' awareness of the history of literary theory, and of current debates around the study, interpretation, and evaluation of literary texts. Some of the major exponents of literary theory from Aristotle to the poststructuralists are studied. Through the study of selected literary texts, students are encouraged to examine how texts themselves (re)stage the theoretical debates around them.

ENG 330-339 TOPICS IN THEATRE: STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE

This course concentrates on selected works of Shakespeare, examining how those were shaped by the world of Elizabethan and Jacobean England. Looking at a selection of dramatic works and non-dramatic poetry, students will be encouraged to explore the social and cultural dimensions of Shakespeare's literary production. It is expected that, by the end of the semester, students will have gained an appreciation of Shakespeare's rhetorical techniques and will be able to demonstrate familiarity with the major genres and themes of Shakespeare's work. Further, that they will be able to comment on Shakespeare's use of sources, to interpret the texts under study in their broader cultural and historical contexts, and to examine Shakespeare's plays as material artefacts. Texts will be studied from multiple theoretical perspectives, enabling students to interpret texts and subtexts and to apply select critical theories to Shakespeare's works.

ENG 330-339 TOPICS IN THEATRE: STUDIES IN EARLY MODERN DRAMA

This course concentrates on some of the most important dramatists of the Elizabethan and Jacobean period in England, exclusive of Shakespeare (e.g. Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, Thomas Kyd, and John Webster.) Class work will focus on the reading of selected dramatic texts, while students will be required more broadly to place early modern drama within its historical and cultural context. In particular, students will be encouraged to consider the ways in which these texts engage with a set of profound changes that transformed English culture and society in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, such as those brought about by (among other things) the Protestant Reformation, the rise of the cities, the growing power of the middle classes, England's attempts at colonization, and the emergence of a national identity.

ENG 330-339 TOPICS IN THEATRE: THEMES IN EIGHTEENTH AND NINETEENTH CENTURY DRAMA

The course will explore eighteenth and nineteenth century plays in the context of the emergence of the bourgeois and the proletarian public spheres, as these have been theorized by critics such as Peter Szondi, Jürgen Habermas, Oscar Negt, Alexander Kluge, and others. Students will examine a range of generic transformations in the theatre, such as sentimental bourgeois drama, gothic drama, romantic drama, and melodrama. Students will produce critical reports on plays, creative projects, and a final essay.

ENG 330-339 TOPICS IN THEATRE: MODERN DRAMA

The course will focus on major playwrights from the late nineteenth century to the present whose theories and plays have determined the development of modern drama, such as Bertolt Brecht, Antonin Artaud, and Augusto Boal. The development of specific genres, such as realism, epic theatre, and postmodern approaches to the theatre, will also be examined. Students will do creative and analytical projects, including critical reports and a final essay.

ENG 330-339 TOPICS IN THEATRE: ANGLOPHONE POST-WAR DRAMA

The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the diverse field of Anglophone post-war drama. Discussions will focus on some of the most important theatrical movements that developed from 1945 to the present, in most cases in the margins of or against the so-called 'commercial' theatre: namely, the theatre of the absurd, the socialist realism of the 'Angry young men', the happenings of avant-garde theatre, activist theatre, physical theatre, body theatre, and forms of postmodern theatrical production that are based on the use of multimedia, the mixture of different theatrical, literary or artistic genres, improvisation, and collective work. Particular emphasis will be given to the interplay between text and performance as well as to the relationship between the theatrical work produced after World War II in English and its political, social, and philosophical context.

ENG 341 PSYCHOLINGUISTICS

This course acquaints students with a wide range of issues in psycholinguistic research. Topics covered include the factors that enhance and hamper learning, the major theories of learning and their application to language, first language acquisition and second language learning, issues in bilingualism, cognitive development, biological foundations of language, and the area of zoosemiotics.

ENG 350 EFL TEACHING METHODOLOGY

This course aims at preparing prospective teachers of English for their future work in the classroom. It introduces students to theories of learning and teaching, various traditional and innovative methodologies of teaching foreign languages, lesson planning, the selection and use of various teaching aids, and the organisation and evaluation of teaching materials. Students are guided in their teaching practice.

ENG 390-399 TOPICS IN TRANSLATION STUDIES

Drawing on the theoretical background that students have acquired, these courses will focus on translation as cross-cultural transfer and as inter-semiotic activity so as to foreground the connection of translation to intercultural studies. The courses will draw on cross-cultural theory in order to think through the connection or gap between the causation of translation and its reception. This cluster of courses will discuss cultural products and environments as found, for example, in literature, poetry, drama and film, and the transformations and comparative aesthetic and ideological contexts in which transfer circulates. Attention will also be given to how different media affect transfer, and how translation is related to or is different from other modes of cross-cultural transfer, such as travel writing and ethnography, mapping the boundaries, and highlighting the role of translation in cultural exchange.

(b) Indicative list of elective courses

Studies in Victorian Fiction

Cultural Representations: Class, Race & Gender 1790-2005

The American West in the Contemporary Literary ImaginationAmerican Culture in the 1960s

American Culture and Protestantism

20th Century American Poetry

The Contemporary American Novel

Representations of Οtherness in Early Modern England

Literature of the English Revolution

Theatre of the English Renaissance

Studies in Renaissance Verse Drama

Studies in Shakespeare I

Studies in Shakespeare II

Theatre and Cultural Studies of the 18th and 19th century

Twentieth Century American Drama

Romanticism and the Novel

Post-colonial Literature

The Literature of the Uncanny

English Literature and Culture at the Fin-de-Siècle

Literature of American Minorities

Seminar in American Studies I

Seminar in American Studies II

Seminar in Comparative Studies I

Seminar in Comparative Studies II

Women Writers and Fantasy

Feminist Literary Theory

Seminar in the Study of Postmodernism

Outcasts and Popular Culture

Topics in the History of Literary Genres

World Literature and Women's Writing

Metamorphoses: Narratives and Theories of Becoming in Contemporary Feminism

Gothic Representations of the East

Cultures of Modernism

Experimental Theatre

Studies in Literary Essay

Studies in Poetry and Poetics

Femininity and Fashion in Victorian Times

Self, Truth and Language in Modern Autobiographical Texts

Partition and Literature in Ireland

Yeats, Joyce and the Nation

Melodrama: Theatre, Cinema, Criticism

Note: The above seminars (elective courses) may vary from year to year as they are subject to staff availability and overall planning needs. An online announcement of titles and descriptions will be made at the beginning of each semester, before the registration period.

Prerequisites for the courses of the Anglophone Literature and Culture track:

ENG 120 Introduction to the Study of Poetry is prerequisite for Topics in Poetry courses

ENG 130 Introduction to Drama is prerequisite for Topics in Drama courses

ENG 110 Introduction to the Study of Fiction is prerequisite for Topics in Fiction courses